No (Lab) Jacket Required: Designing Experiments for Learning

This is a workshop that Karl Scotland and I developed that helps participants learn how to design experiments for learning. Some of the materials we use are available for everyone to use under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Abstract

Hypothesis-Driven Development is thinking about the development of new ideas, products and services – even organizational change – as a series of experiments to determine whether an expected outcome will be achieved, so we need to know how to design and run experiments properly.

This session helps participants understand the importance of using experiments to help teams and organizations learn and improve, while giving hands-on practice in designing experiments to yield measurable evidence for that learning. We’ll even play a couple of inductive-logic games to get us in the mindset of how to write tests to validate — and invalidate — our hypotheses in order to acquire knowledge.

Whether you’re in product development of organizational improvement, for those wanting to move from projects to experiments in the quest of continuous learning and evolutionary improvement, this session will provide the tools and mindset for going beyond simply calling something an experiment to conducting experiments with the proper rigor to maximize learning.

This session helps participants:

  • understand the importance of using experiments to help teams and organizations learn and improve
  • gain hands-on practice in designing experiments to yield measurable evidence for that learning
  • understand how to properly measure outcomes without confirmation bias